Tim Bryant

Photo of Dr. Tim Bryant
613) 533-2564         

Roles

  • KGHRI research scientist and Co-Director, Human Mobility Research Centre

  • Professor, Mechanical and Materials Engineering and Donald and Joan McGeachy Chair in Biomedical Engineering, Queen’s University

 

Interests

Orthoses and Prostheses, Structural Tissue Engineering / Biomaterials, Joints (Articulations), Arthritis / Osteo-Arthritis

Bio

Tim Bryant holds the Donald and Joan McGeachy Chair in Biomedical Engineering at Queen’s. As a member of the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, and the Department of Surgery, he is recognized for fundamental studies in biomechanics and biomaterials. Most recently, Dr. Bryant has participated as the scientific lead in an international consortium that was awarded the Medical Design Excellence Award Gold Medal for a high-performance, affordable prosthetic foot now used throughout the world.

Education and honours

  • Doctorate, Mechanical Engineering, Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen's University at Kingston

  • Master’s, Mechanical Engineering, Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen's University at Kingston

  • Bachelor’s, Mechanical Engineering, Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen's University at Kingston
  • Medical Design Excellence Award
  • Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry
  • Hall of Fame (Builder's Award)
    Canadian Orthopaedic Research Society
  • Past President's Award
    Canadian Society for Biomechanics

Research

Tim Bryant’s three main research areas are: Friction, Lubrication and Wear in Orthopaedic Bearings; Joint Biomechanics; and Assistive Device Design. All three areas are based on the application of mechanical analysis and measurement methods to practical problems in orthopaedics and ergonomics; most projects also integrate techniques for materials property modelling and optimization and are focused on translatable outcomes.

 

Other Publications

Read about Dr. Bryant’s groundbreaking work in building better prostheses:

http://www.innovation.ca/en/ResearchInAction/ImpactStory/betterfootforward